Josh is the executive director of the Center for Public Christianity, lead teacher for New City Fellows and theologian-in-residence at Holy Trinity Anglican Church. His writing and speaking focuses on public theology, apologetics and culture. He has written and edited several books including, Apologetics at the Cross, Cultural Engagement, The History of Apologetics, Telling a Better Story, Truth Matters, and Truth in a Culture of Doubt. His writing has received numerous awards, Outreach Magazine Resource of the Year in Apologetics and The Gospel Coalition’s Book of the Year in Apologetics/Evangelism, and his work has been featured in outlets such as Christianity Today, Gospel Coalition, World Magazine, and the Washington Post. He earned his Ph.D. in Biblical Studies from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, a Masters of Divinity from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and a Bachelors in Business from Georgia Southern University. Josh has served in a full-time academic teaching post, as well as pastorates at churches in Virginia and Georgia. Josh and his wife, Tracy, have two children, Addison and Hudson.

Christianity and #MeToo

We live in a day where it seems that every public issue becomes weaponized to score partisan points.  The painful reality is that when these verbal bombs start flying, problems aren’t actually solved, and suffering is not relieved. Wounds are made worse rather than healed. In our cultural movement, the very act of having hard…

The Better Story

Our opening few weeks of the New City Fellows program focuses on the biblical storyline. One of the reasons we do this is because of how pervasive stories are for humans. As the NYU social scientist Jonathan Haidt points out, “The human mind is a story processor, not a logic processor.”[1]   As we invent…

Your Work Matters

If you add up our work time—hours at work, time tidying up the house, the seemingly endless lawn work, the extended homework sessions, the evenings spent answering work emails—the result for many of us is that the majority of life is spent working. And in work, we often sense that there has to be meaning…